The medical profession is full of complex words. As clinicians we use these on a regular basis and they become second nature to us. Attending a clinic or reading about your disease can become bewildering. The following is a short glossary of some of the most commonly used terms in sarcoma surgery.
Adjuvant
Benign
Biopsy
Chemotherapy
CT scan
Deep
Distal
Histology
Heterogenous
Homogenous
Immuno-histochemistry
Lateral
Malignant
Marginal
Medial
Mesenchyme(al)
Metastasis
MDT
Neo-adjuvant
Neuro-vascular bundle
Palliative
PET scan
Proximal
Pulmonary
Refractory
Remission
Sarcoma
Staging
Superficial
USS
Wide local excision




Explanations

Benign
Non malignant; will not spread, is not a cancer

Biopsy
A sample of tissue. This may be taken using a needle after a local anaesthetic numbing injection. Some biopsies are “open”, this means that the sample is cut out with a scalpel,(after a local anaesthetic!) and the wound is sewn up. Most biopsies for suspected sarcomas are taken with a needle. This is also called a “core biopsy” because a thin core, or slither, of the lump is removed by the needle. All specemins are then sent to the histology department for tests.




Sarcoma, Derriford, Plymouth, Devon, Cornwall, Peninsula, Southwest, South West, Angiosarcoma, Liposarcoma, Rhabdomyosarcoma, Leiomyosarcoma, MFH, Malignant Fibro Histio Sarcoma, South West, Plymouth, Treliske